Building under windows

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Building under windows

Ian McCallion
Does anyone build octave under windows?

If so is there a beginners guide somewhere that I can follow to get me started?
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Re: Building under windows

Richard Crozier
On 25/08/18 14:26, Ian McCallion wrote:
> Does anyone build octave under windows?
>
> If so is there a beginners guide somewhere that I can follow to get me
> started?


The windows version of octave is cross-compiled from linux, i.e. built
on a Linux computer. I think you will find it challenging to do a native
build to say the least. The standard way to build the windows version is
to use mxe-octave, info here:

https://wiki.octave.org/Windows_Installer

You might be able to do this on Windows 10 if you install the linux
subsystem for Linux and and build it in that environment. Never tried
this, and have no idea if it works.

Regards,

Richard

--
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
Scotland, with registration number SC005336.


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Re: Building under windows

nrjank
On Sat, Aug 25, 2018, 09:53 Richard Crozier <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 25/08/18 14:26, Ian McCallion wrote:
> Does anyone build octave under windows?
>
> If so is there a beginners guide somewhere that I can follow to get me
> started?


The windows version of octave is cross-compiled from linux, i.e. built
on a Linux computer. I think you will find it challenging to do a native
build to say the least. The standard way to build the windows version is
to use mxe-octave, info here:

https://wiki.octave.org/Windows_Installer

You might be able to do this on Windows 10 if you install the linux
subsystem for Linux and and build it in that environment. Never tried
this, and have no idea if it work


FYI  the Windows subsystem for Linux details:

Would be great if this worked and we could document it.
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Re: Building under windows

mmuetzel
Some months ago, I installed the "Ubuntu App" for the Windows subsystem for
Linux and successfully compiled Octave with it.
Installing the App is as easy as hitting the "Install" button in the Windows
Store.
The instructions for compiling Octave are the same as for a "real" Ubuntu.
With an installed X-Server for Windows (I used VcXsrv), it even runs with
the GUI. I thought that plotting was possible too. But testing that now, it
crashes the X-Server.
A real downside is that all file operations seem to be incredibly slow.
Thus, compilation took quite some time. This might be a local system thing
(maybe antivirus?).
To get a true native Windows application, cross-compiling with MXE Octave is
still necessary. I never tried that with the "Ubuntu App" however.

Personally, I went back to running Ubuntu in a "real" VM because that seemed
to perform much faster.

It would be interesting to hear other's experience.

Markus



--
Sent from: http://octave.1599824.n4.nabble.com/Octave-Maintainers-f1638794.html

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Re: Building under windows

tmacchant
In reply to this post by Ian McCallion
--- markus.muetzel

> Some months ago, I installed the "Ubuntu App" for the Windows subsystem for
> Linux and successfully compiled Octave with it.
> Installing the App is as easy as hitting the "Install" button in the Windows
> Store.
> The instructions for compiling Octave are the same as for a "real" Ubuntu.
> With an installed X-Server for Windows (I used VcXsrv), it even runs with
> the GUI. I thought that plotting was possible too. But testing that now, it
> crashes the X-Server.
> A real downside is that all file operations seem to be incredibly slow.
> Thus, compilation took quite some time. This might be a local system thing
> (maybe antivirus?).
> To get a true native Windows application, cross-compiling with MXE Octave is
> still necessary. I never tried that with the "Ubuntu App" however.
>
> Personally, I went back to running Ubuntu in a "real" VM because that seemed
> to perform much faster.
>
> It would be interesting to hear other's experience.
>
> Markus
>
>
>

I have tried to build octave 4.4.1 on wsl using using ubuntu 18.04.  Slow build on wsl relys on slow fork on wsl.  That is similar to slow fork  on cygwin. fork in wsl is faster than that on  cygwin.

Tatsuro

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Re: Building under windows

tmacchant




----- Original Message -----

> From: Tatsuro MATSUOKA <[hidden email]>
> To: mmuetzel <[hidden email]>; "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
> Cc:
> Date: 2018/8/26, Sun 01:36
> Subject: Re: Building under windows
>
> --- markus.muetzel
>>  Some months ago, I installed the "Ubuntu App" for the Windows
> subsystem for
>>  Linux and successfully compiled Octave with it.
>>  Installing the App is as easy as hitting the "Install" button in
> the Windows
>>  Store.
>>  The instructions for compiling Octave are the same as for a
> "real" Ubuntu.
>>  With an installed X-Server for Windows (I used VcXsrv), it even runs with
>>  the GUI. I thought that plotting was possible too. But testing that now, it
>>  crashes the X-Server.
>>  A real downside is that all file operations seem to be incredibly slow.
>>  Thus, compilation took quite some time. This might be a local system thing
>>  (maybe antivirus?).
>>  To get a true native Windows application, cross-compiling with MXE Octave
> is
>>  still necessary. I never tried that with the "Ubuntu App"
> however.
>>
>>  Personally, I went back to running Ubuntu in a "real" VM because
> that seemed
>>  to perform much faster.
>>
>>  It would be interesting to hear other's experience.
>>
>>  Markus
>>
>>
>>
>
> I have tried to build octave 4.4.1 on wsl using using ubuntu 18.04.  Slow build
> on wsl relys on slow fork on wsl.  That is similar to slow fork  on cygwin. fork
> in wsl is faster than that on  cygwin.
>
> Tatsuro
>


>> To get a true native Windows application, cross-compiling with MXE Octave 
> is
>> still necessary


I tried this before but I abandon to do it because it is very very slow.
It is better to prepare real linux PC to purchase corei5 PC from net auction.
(I do it)

Tatsuro

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Re: Building under windows

tmacchant
In reply to this post by mmuetzel




----- Original Message -----

> From: mmuetzel 
> To: octave-maintainers
> Cc:
> Date: 2018/8/26, Sun 01:15
> Subject: Re: Building under windows
>
> Some months ago, I installed the "Ubuntu App" for the Windows
> subsystem for
> Linux and successfully compiled Octave with it.
> Installing the App is as easy as hitting the "Install" button in the
> Windows
> Store.
> The instructions for compiling Octave are the same as for a "real"
> Ubuntu.
> With an installed X-Server for Windows (I used VcXsrv), it even runs with
> the GUI. I thought that plotting was possible too. But testing that now, it
> crashes the X-Server.
For me it does not crash but no plot appear with qt graphics_toolkit.|
For fltk, plot appear immediately.




> A real downside is that all file operations seem to be incredibly slow.
> Thus, compilation took quite some time. This might be a local system thing
> (maybe antivirus?).
> To get a true native Windows application, cross-compiling with MXE Octave is
> still necessary. I never tried that with the "Ubuntu App" however.
>
> Personally, I went back to running Ubuntu in a "real" VM because that
> seemed
> to perform much faster.
>
> It would be interesting to hear other's experience.
>
> Markus
>
>
>
> --
> Sent from: http://octave.1599824.n4.nabble.com/Octave-Maintainers-f1638794.html
>