Contribution to Octave as a PM

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Contribution to Octave as a PM

Julien Hamilton

Dear Octave Contributors,


I’m an IT Project Manager currently working in New York in the banking industry. During my University studies I used MATLAB a lot for various IT projects. Then during a previous job I was responsible for MATLAB servers and licenses for a Quantitative team in a Swiss bank. This is where I realized how much MATLAB can cost...


I discovered Octave a few years ago and I really believe in it. I think it’s a really good alternative to MATLAB for most people and I would like to contribute to it. I’m not a developer but I know MATLAB/Octave and a bit of C/C++. You can find more information about me on my LinkedIn profile: www.linkedin.com/in/julienhamilton.


I have good project management skills and I would like to know if there would be needs for them. I’m well organized so maybe I can help you guys with tracking the different Octave projects for example? We could use a product backlog system instead of just a page "Projects", e.g. a system where you can sort projects by estimated workload, priority, etc. I could also be involved in marketing if there are needs. I know that many people in finance don’t know that this product exists on the market.


I would be happy if you guys think that my profile can contribute to the success of Octave.



Best Regards,

Julien Hamilton

 

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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Michael Godfrey
On 02/03/2014 05:14 PM, Julien Hamilton wrote:
>
> I would be happy if you guys think that my profile can contribute to
> the success of Octave.
>
>
This looks very useful to me. You may want to take this up directly with
John Eaton.

Michael

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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

fgnievinski
In reply to this post by Julien Hamilton
Nice to see more fellow non-coder contributors.

A little while ago I started a Marketing & Community section in the wiki Projects page:
<http://wiki.octave.org/Projects#Marketing_and_Community>
It has links to the exemplary Apache OpenOffice Marketing team.
May I single out this existing task: "Help design a user or a developer survey".  It'd be a first step towards a market research for Octave.

As you, I was first exposed to Matlab in college -- fact which MathWorks knows very well, given that they have a road show delivering presentations at the main U.S. universities at least once a year -- so I've just added this item: "Help prepare and deliver presentations about Octave at colleges and universities."

Let me illustrate two usage cases where your project management skills could serve Octave well.  Every now and then someone joins the list and offers to help and asks for guidance on where to start.  As of now, we point them to the wiki Project Ideas, <http://wiki.octave.org/Category:Project_Ideas>.  But it's a bit dry -- it could be made more attractive.  Besides, I suspect it only list stalled projects -- it doesn't include ongoing projects, things like classdef and the gui which are both under active development and could showcase how healthy and strong the Octave development is.  

Another example is that Octave accepts for donations although I think it could leverage more income if it offered reverse bounties, i.e., the option to pay (partially) for missing features. These would be cost estimates offered by developers-for-hire, against which users could pledge to pay for.  From the user's viewpoint, it'd be a more tangible return on investment, compared to open-ended donations.  This site seems well tailored for the purpose: <https://www.catincan.com/>.

Off course, this is just my biased opinion.
-F.
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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Juan Pablo Carbajal-2
On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 9:14 PM, fgnievinski <[hidden email]> wrote:
> This site seems well tailored for the
> purpose: <https://www.catincan.com/>.

Using non-libre software to promote the value of GNU doesn't sound
well tailored to me.
Also they miss the point about libre vs. open source.
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/open-source-misses-the-point.html
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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

fgnievinski
Apart for the implementation software, how do you like the idea itself?
-F.
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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Julien Hamilton
Dear All,

Thank you Fgnievinski for your ideas. I want to single out one of your points: "[the wiki Project Ideas] could be made more attractive". I really think Octave is a great product to contribute and we should clearly show it. Lots of people are looking to contribute to motivating open-source projects and if we can show that at Octave we maintain a well-organized, dynamic list of projects then I'm sure it will motivate people to join our effort. The key is also to facilitate the contributions by improving our "getting started" documents.

I also agree with improving the website. With a "corporate" website we would show that Octave is serious and can be completely used at a professional level. The first contact with an IT product is the website and trust me so many people start to judge the product by actually judging the website. The "website improvement" could be in the list of Octave projects and it would be a creative and challenging project for a web designer who wants to expand his/her portfolio.

I agree we should also focus on presentations, not only to universities but also companies: too few professionals are aware of Octave as a good replacement of MATLAB. And it's always good if we can show that (well-known) companies use Octave.

@Juan: you can find companies ready to pay people to develop completely free ("libre") software. It might sound contradictory but it happens. I give you an example: a R&D company needs a new analysis tool and notices that Octave matches half their needs. So instead of starting a tool from scratch they decide to pay a developer to develop new Octave features that will cover the remaining 50%. They accept that the code will be free because what only matters to them is that they can cut the development cost in half. Moreover they don't want to fork Octave because they still want to take advantage of the future main releases. As you can see in this scenario a paid development generated free software. This is only possible if your free product is strong enough and people are ready to invest in new features.

I think paid features and donations are a good financial model for projects like Octave. Catincan is more tailored for open-source startups and less for wide projects like Octave.

Best Regards,
Julien Hamilton

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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

CdeMills
The opensource ecosystem is vast and diversified.

On the one hand, you're right that Octave could benefit from funding. OTOH, promoting Octave as the-poor-man  MatLab does not seems adaquate to me. At first, we will appear as a MatLab concurrent, and as so will become a "target" for actions. Second, when I see students from countries where copyright laws are less enforced, they all have crackeds version of you-just-name-it. They prefer to use some MatLab of dubious ancestry because "it is standard". They mean it both ways: everybody write and diffuse code in THIS language, and everybody crack it.

I thus conclude that "money" should not be the only argument; we should agree on other metrics to promote actions around Octave.

Regards
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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Juan Pablo Carbajal-2
In reply to this post by Julien Hamilton
On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 7:37 AM, Julien Hamilton
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Dear All,
>
> Thank you Fgnievinski for your ideas. I want to single out one of your
> points: "[the wiki Project Ideas] could be made more attractive". I really
> think Octave is a great product to contribute and we should clearly show it.
> Lots of people are looking to contribute to motivating open-source projects
> and if we can show that at Octave we maintain a well-organized, dynamic list
> of projects then I'm sure it will motivate people to join our effort. The
> key is also to facilitate the contributions by improving our "getting
> started" documents.
>
> I also agree with improving the website. With a "corporate" website we would
> show that Octave is serious and can be completely used at a professional
> level. The first contact with an IT product is the website and trust me so
> many people start to judge the product by actually judging the website. The
> "website improvement" could be in the list of Octave projects and it would
> be a creative and challenging project for a web designer who wants to expand
> his/her portfolio.
>
> I agree we should also focus on presentations, not only to universities but
> also companies: too few professionals are aware of Octave as a good
> replacement of MATLAB. And it's always good if we can show that (well-known)
> companies use Octave.
>
> @Juan: you can find companies ready to pay people to develop completely free
> ("libre") software. It might sound contradictory but it happens. I give you
> an example: a R&D company needs a new analysis tool and notices that Octave
> matches half their needs. So instead of starting a tool from scratch they
> decide to pay a developer to develop new Octave features that will cover the
> remaining 50%. They accept that the code will be free because what only
> matters to them is that they can cut the development cost in half. Moreover
> they don't want to fork Octave because they still want to take advantage of
> the future main releases. As you can see in this scenario a paid development
> generated free software. This is only possible if your free product is
> strong enough and people are ready to invest in new features.
>
My point is that there are values(principles, ideals, whatever) behind
being a GNU software. It is not just going around liek crazy to
collect money. There is a higher objective that we aim at and that is
libre software. I am very aware of people willing to
provide money for development of libre software, Google without going
too far away.

It would be good to listen to your idea of a "corporate" website, in
principle sounds good, but devil is in the details. Jordi has already
commented on this...
I do not think we are craving for money, money is just a tool to
achieve other objectives. And those objectives are
what really matter, not the other way around. It is important that you
familiarize yourself with the GNU perspective.

You may also be interested in the Agora project. Have you heard of it?
agora.octave.org
Suggestions/work there would be welcomed.

> I think paid features and donations are a good financial model for projects
> like Octave. Catincan is more tailored for open-source startups and less for
> wide projects like Octave.
>
> Best Regards,
> Julien Hamilton
>

Jordi and John and other developers have been trying to build a
sustainable activity around GNU Octave. GNU Octave being their tool
for the consultant/problem-solving/task-force actions that they will
charge for. Somebody has already suggested this, but talking directly
to them (IRC #octave in freenode would be the best place) might be a
god starting point.

Cheers
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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

fgnievinski
In reply to this post by CdeMills
Agreed; we could borrow from AOO:
"Great software; Easy to use; and it's free!"
-F.


On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 6:33 AM, CdeMills [via Octave] <[hidden email]> wrote:
The opensource ecosystem is vast and diversified.

On the one hand, you're right that Octave could benefit from funding. OTOH, promoting Octave as the-poor-man  MatLab does not seems adaquate to me. At first, we will appear as a MatLab concurrent, and as so will become a "target" for actions. Second, when I see students from countries where copyright laws are less enforced, they all have crackeds version of you-just-name-it. They prefer to use some MatLab of dubious ancestry because "it is standard". They mean it both ways: everybody write and diffuse code in THIS language, and everybody crack it.

I thus conclude that "money" should not be the only argument; we should agree on other metrics to promote actions around Octave.

Regards


If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://octave.1599824.n4.nabble.com/Contribution-to-Octave-as-a-PM-tp4661600p4661634.html
To unsubscribe from Contribution to Octave as a PM, click here.
NAML

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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Juan Pablo Carbajal-2
On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 2:09 PM, fgnievinski <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Agreed; we could borrow from AOO:
> <http://www.openoffice.org/why/>
> "Great software; Easy to use; and it's free!"
> -F.
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 6:33 AM, CdeMills [via Octave] <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>
>> The opensource ecosystem is vast and diversified.
>>
>> On the one hand, you're right that Octave could benefit from funding.
>> OTOH, promoting Octave as the-poor-man  MatLab does not seems adaquate to
>> me. At first, we will appear as a MatLab concurrent, and as so will become a
>> "target" for actions. Second, when I see students from countries where
>> copyright laws are less enforced, they all have crackeds version of
>> you-just-name-it. They prefer to use some MatLab of dubious ancestry because
>> "it is standard". They mean it both ways: everybody write and diffuse code
>> in THIS language, and everybody crack it.
>>
>> I thus conclude that "money" should not be the only argument; we should
>> agree on other metrics to promote actions around Octave.
>>
>> Regards
>>
>> ________________________________
>> If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion
>> below:
>>
>> http://octave.1599824.n4.nabble.com/Contribution-to-Octave-as-a-PM-tp4661600p4661634.html
>> To unsubscribe from Contribution to Octave as a PM, click here.
>> NAML
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> View this message in context: Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM
>
> Sent from the Octave - Maintainers mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

I do not think this is exactly the message we want to highlight
"and it's free
Best of all, Apache OpenOffice can be downloaded and used entirely
free of any license fees."

It is not best of all, it is a consequence of the other values we are
trying to promote: freedom.
I would not even highlight this point but the other advantages of
libre software.
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/open-source-misses-the-point.html
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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Julien Hamilton
Hi Juan,

I agree it should not be all about the money. I was just giving an example where libre software can be created by paid developments.

My idea here is to help to make Octave a little bit more popular and attractive to contributors, and not to go against GNU principles.

JH


On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 8:20 AM, Juan Pablo Carbajal <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 2:09 PM, fgnievinski <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Agreed; we could borrow from AOO:
> <http://www.openoffice.org/why/>
> "Great software; Easy to use; and it's free!"
> -F.
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 6:33 AM, CdeMills [via Octave] <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>
>> The opensource ecosystem is vast and diversified.
>>
>> On the one hand, you're right that Octave could benefit from funding.
>> OTOH, promoting Octave as the-poor-man  MatLab does not seems adaquate to
>> me. At first, we will appear as a MatLab concurrent, and as so will become a
>> "target" for actions. Second, when I see students from countries where
>> copyright laws are less enforced, they all have crackeds version of
>> you-just-name-it. They prefer to use some MatLab of dubious ancestry because
>> "it is standard". They mean it both ways: everybody write and diffuse code
>> in THIS language, and everybody crack it.
>>
>> I thus conclude that "money" should not be the only argument; we should
>> agree on other metrics to promote actions around Octave.
>>
>> Regards
>>
>> ________________________________
>> If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion
>> below:
>>
>> http://octave.1599824.n4.nabble.com/Contribution-to-Octave-as-a-PM-tp4661600p4661634.html
>> To unsubscribe from Contribution to Octave as a PM, click here.
>> NAML
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> View this message in context: Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM
>
> Sent from the Octave - Maintainers mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

I do not think this is exactly the message we want to highlight
"and it's free
Best of all, Apache OpenOffice can be downloaded and used entirely
free of any license fees."

It is not best of all, it is a consequence of the other values we are
trying to promote: freedom.
I would not even highlight this point but the other advantages of
libre software.
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/open-source-misses-the-point.html

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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

fgnievinski
In reply to this post by Juan Pablo Carbajal-2


On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 10:26 AM, Juan Pablo Carbajal-2 [via Octave] <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 7:37 AM, Julien Hamilton
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Dear All,
>
> Thank you Fgnievinski for your ideas. I want to single out one of your
> points: "[the wiki Project Ideas] could be made more attractive". I really
> think Octave is a great product to contribute and we should clearly show it.
> Lots of people are looking to contribute to motivating open-source projects
> and if we can show that at Octave we maintain a well-organized, dynamic list
> of projects then I'm sure it will motivate people to join our effort. The
> key is also to facilitate the contributions by improving our "getting
> started" documents.
>
> I also agree with improving the website. With a "corporate" website we would
> show that Octave is serious and can be completely used at a professional
> level. The first contact with an IT product is the website and trust me so
> many people start to judge the product by actually judging the website. The
> "website improvement" could be in the list of Octave projects and it would
> be a creative and challenging project for a web designer who wants to expand
> his/her portfolio.
>
> I agree we should also focus on presentations, not only to universities but
> also companies: too few professionals are aware of Octave as a good
> replacement of MATLAB. And it's always good if we can show that (well-known)
> companies use Octave.
>
> @Juan: you can find companies ready to pay people to develop completely free
> ("libre") software. It might sound contradictory but it happens. I give you
> an example: a R&D company needs a new analysis tool and notices that Octave
> matches half their needs. So instead of starting a tool from scratch they
> decide to pay a developer to develop new Octave features that will cover the
> remaining 50%. They accept that the code will be free because what only
> matters to them is that they can cut the development cost in half. Moreover
> they don't want to fork Octave because they still want to take advantage of
> the future main releases. As you can see in this scenario a paid development
> generated free software. This is only possible if your free product is
> strong enough and people are ready to invest in new features.
>
My point is that there are values(principles, ideals, whatever) behind
being a GNU software. It is not just going around liek crazy to
collect money. There is a higher objective that we aim at and that is
libre software. I am very aware of people willing to
provide money for development of libre software, Google without going
too far away.

It would be good to listen to your idea of a "corporate" website, in
principle sounds good, but devil is in the details. Jordi has already
commented on this...
I do not think we are craving for money, money is just a tool to
achieve other objectives. And those objectives are
what really matter, not the other way around. It is important that you
familiarize yourself with the GNU perspective.

You may also be interested in the Agora project. Have you heard of it?
agora.octave.org
Suggestions/work there would be welcomed.

> I think paid features and donations are a good financial model for projects
> like Octave. Catincan is more tailored for open-source startups and less for
> wide projects like Octave.
>
> Best Regards,
> Julien Hamilton
>

Jordi and John and other developers have been trying to build a
sustainable activity around GNU Octave. GNU Octave being their tool
for the consultant/problem-solving/task-force actions that they will
charge for. Somebody has already suggested this, but talking directly
to them (IRC #octave in freenode would be the best place) might be a
god starting point.

Cheers



If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://octave.1599824.n4.nabble.com/Contribution-to-Octave-as-a-PM-tp4661600p4661653.html
To unsubscribe from Contribution to Octave as a PM, click here.
NAML

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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Juan Pablo Carbajal-2
In reply to this post by Julien Hamilton
On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 2:24 PM, Julien Hamilton
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Juan,
>
> I agree it should not be all about the money. I was just giving an example
> where libre software can be created by paid developments.
>
> My idea here is to help to make Octave a little bit more popular and
> attractive to contributors, and not to go against GNU principles.
>
> JH
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 8:20 AM, Juan Pablo Carbajal <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>
>> On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 2:09 PM, fgnievinski <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> > Agreed; we could borrow from AOO:
>> > <http://www.openoffice.org/why/>
>> > "Great software; Easy to use; and it's free!"
>> > -F.
>> >
>> >
>> > On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 6:33 AM, CdeMills [via Octave] <[hidden email]>
>> > wrote:
>> >>
>> >> The opensource ecosystem is vast and diversified.
>> >>
>> >> On the one hand, you're right that Octave could benefit from funding.
>> >> OTOH, promoting Octave as the-poor-man  MatLab does not seems adaquate
>> >> to
>> >> me. At first, we will appear as a MatLab concurrent, and as so will
>> >> become a
>> >> "target" for actions. Second, when I see students from countries where
>> >> copyright laws are less enforced, they all have crackeds version of
>> >> you-just-name-it. They prefer to use some MatLab of dubious ancestry
>> >> because
>> >> "it is standard". They mean it both ways: everybody write and diffuse
>> >> code
>> >> in THIS language, and everybody crack it.
>> >>
>> >> I thus conclude that "money" should not be the only argument; we should
>> >> agree on other metrics to promote actions around Octave.
>> >>
>> >> Regards
>> >>
>> >> ________________________________
>> >> If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the
>> >> discussion
>> >> below:
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> http://octave.1599824.n4.nabble.com/Contribution-to-Octave-as-a-PM-tp4661600p4661634.html
>> >> To unsubscribe from Contribution to Octave as a PM, click here.
>> >> NAML
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > ________________________________
>> > View this message in context: Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM
>> >
>> > Sent from the Octave - Maintainers mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>>
>> I do not think this is exactly the message we want to highlight
>> "and it's free
>> Best of all, Apache OpenOffice can be downloaded and used entirely
>> free of any license fees."
>>
>> It is not best of all, it is a consequence of the other values we are
>> trying to promote: freedom.
>> I would not even highlight this point but the other advantages of
>> libre software.
>> http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/open-source-misses-the-point.html
>
>

Julien,
Sure, and is great that people with your background join in. I fully
support your initiative. but I think is important to highlight this
little details earlier better than later.

It would be awesome if at some point we could organize an Octave
contest...with prizes! :D
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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Julien Hamilton
Haha why not Juan!

Yes it's always a challenge when you want to improve a software, making it more "corporate", but with staying with the basic principles. I was thinking about the fact that Octave offers functions to connect to the nonfree software Microsoft Excel.

JH


On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 8:28 AM, Juan Pablo Carbajal <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 2:24 PM, Julien Hamilton
<[hidden email]> wrote:
> Hi Juan,
>
> I agree it should not be all about the money. I was just giving an example
> where libre software can be created by paid developments.
>
> My idea here is to help to make Octave a little bit more popular and
> attractive to contributors, and not to go against GNU principles.
>
> JH
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 8:20 AM, Juan Pablo Carbajal <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>
>> On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 2:09 PM, fgnievinski <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> > Agreed; we could borrow from AOO:
>> > <http://www.openoffice.org/why/>
>> > "Great software; Easy to use; and it's free!"
>> > -F.
>> >
>> >
>> > On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 6:33 AM, CdeMills [via Octave] <[hidden email]>
>> > wrote:
>> >>
>> >> The opensource ecosystem is vast and diversified.
>> >>
>> >> On the one hand, you're right that Octave could benefit from funding.
>> >> OTOH, promoting Octave as the-poor-man  MatLab does not seems adaquate
>> >> to
>> >> me. At first, we will appear as a MatLab concurrent, and as so will
>> >> become a
>> >> "target" for actions. Second, when I see students from countries where
>> >> copyright laws are less enforced, they all have crackeds version of
>> >> you-just-name-it. They prefer to use some MatLab of dubious ancestry
>> >> because
>> >> "it is standard". They mean it both ways: everybody write and diffuse
>> >> code
>> >> in THIS language, and everybody crack it.
>> >>
>> >> I thus conclude that "money" should not be the only argument; we should
>> >> agree on other metrics to promote actions around Octave.
>> >>
>> >> Regards
>> >>
>> >> ________________________________
>> >> If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the
>> >> discussion
>> >> below:
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> http://octave.1599824.n4.nabble.com/Contribution-to-Octave-as-a-PM-tp4661600p4661634.html
>> >> To unsubscribe from Contribution to Octave as a PM, click here.
>> >> NAML
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > ________________________________
>> > View this message in context: Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM
>> >
>> > Sent from the Octave - Maintainers mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>>
>> I do not think this is exactly the message we want to highlight
>> "and it's free
>> Best of all, Apache OpenOffice can be downloaded and used entirely
>> free of any license fees."
>>
>> It is not best of all, it is a consequence of the other values we are
>> trying to promote: freedom.
>> I would not even highlight this point but the other advantages of
>> libre software.
>> http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/open-source-misses-the-point.html
>
>

Julien,
Sure, and is great that people with your background join in. I fully
support your initiative. but I think is important to highlight this
little details earlier better than later.

It would be awesome if at some point we could organize an Octave
contest...with prizes! :D

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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Markus
Am 2014-02-05 14:40, schrieb Julien Hamilton:
> Haha why not Juan!
>
> Yes it's always a challenge when you want to improve a software,
> making it more "corporate", but with staying with the basic
> principles. I was thinking about the fact that Octave offers functions
> to connect to the nonfree software Microsoft Excel.
>

Stop top-posting!

Since Version 1.2.4, the IO package offers an interface called OCT (pure
written in Octave). And yes, just for ready atm, write-support still
need some time. So what do you want more?



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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Richard Crozier
In reply to this post by Julien Hamilton
On 03/02/2014 22:14, Julien Hamilton wrote:
> Dear Octave Contributors,
>

<snip>

>
> I would be happy if you guys think that my profile can contribute to the
> success of Octave.
>
>
>
> Best Regards,
>
> Julien Hamilton
>

Someone organising the main octave website, including possibly a
redesign of it (don't get me wrong, it's ok, but not a patch on the
slick efforts of, for example, SciLab, or http://www.python.org/) would
in my option be a major aid to Octave.

Similarly someone managing releases, and ensuring all information was
being updated everywhere simultaneously on a release, and perhaps
organising promotion of the release, would in my opinion help the
project. It would also free up some core developer time from these
important but non-coding tasks.

Just my two cents,
Richard Crozier

--
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
Scotland, with registration number SC005336.

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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

fgnievinski
In reply to this post by Markus

On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 11:59 AM, Markus [via Octave] <[hidden email]> wrote:
Am 2014-02-05 14:40, schrieb Julien Hamilton:
> Haha why not Juan!
>
> Yes it's always a challenge when you want to improve a software,
> making it more "corporate", but with staying with the basic
> principles. I was thinking about the fact that Octave offers functions
> to connect to the nonfree software Microsoft Excel.
>

Stop top-posting!

Since Version 1.2.4, the IO package offers an interface called OCT (pure
written in Octave). And yes, just for ready atm, write-support still
need some time. So what do you want more?



Please don't hijack the thread!
-F.
 
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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Juan Pablo Carbajal-2
In reply to this post by Richard Crozier
On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 3:00 PM, Richard <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 03/02/2014 22:14, Julien Hamilton wrote:
>>
>> Dear Octave Contributors,
>>
>
> <snip>
>
>
>>
>> I would be happy if you guys think that my profile can contribute to the
>> success of Octave.
>>
>>
>>
>> Best Regards,
>>
>> Julien Hamilton
>>
>
> Someone organising the main octave website, including possibly a redesign of
> it (don't get me wrong, it's ok, but not a patch on the slick efforts of,
> for example, SciLab, or http://www.python.org/) would in my option be a
> major aid to Octave.
>
> Similarly someone managing releases, and ensuring all information was being
> updated everywhere simultaneously on a release, and perhaps organising
> promotion of the release, would in my opinion help the project. It would
> also free up some core developer time from these important but non-coding
> tasks.
>
> Just my two cents,
> Richard Crozier
>
> --
> The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
> Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
>

All good ideas! So how do you plan to implement those? Go a head and
do a proof of concept aplication/website/mailing list... I am not sure
how you would handle this. Also, make sure you will be able to put
some of your time till things get rolling.
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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

fgnievinski
In reply to this post by Richard Crozier
Another contribution related to your project management skills could be finding ways of facilitating the delegation of tasks.  The current situation is such that existing developers are super busy, while aspirant contributors soon give up if the open projects look daunting or unclear.  Here's a practical remedy idea: take some of the donated money and offer symbolic direct bounties (e.g., 2 cents) for tasks that would be considered trivial for experienced developers, such as bug triage, easy fixes, etc.  I know, the idea might be bad -- I'm just brainstorming here.
-F.
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Re: Contribution to Octave as a PM

Juan Pablo Carbajal-2
On Wed, Feb 5, 2014 at 3:12 PM, fgnievinski <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Another contribution related to your project management skills could be
> finding ways of facilitating the delegation of tasks.  The current situation
> is such that existing developers are super busy, while aspirant contributors
> soon give up if the open projects look daunting or unclear.  Here's a
> practical remedy idea: take some of the donated money and offer symbolic
> direct bounties (e.g., 2 cents) for tasks that would be considered trivial
> for experienced developers, such as bug triage, easy fixes, etc.  I know,
> the idea might be bad -- I'm just brainstorming here.
> -F.
>
>
>
> --
> View this message in context: http://octave.1599824.n4.nabble.com/Contribution-to-Octave-as-a-PM-tp4661600p4661671.html
> Sent from the Octave - Maintainers mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

Ok, sounds liek a thing to try. Now how would you implement any idea
that requieres Octave transferring money to developers? I am not sure
that is possible. for sure one could do it on a personal basis,
somebody send money to somebody else.
- What would be the initial money needed to test one of these ideas?
(we can collect this form the current user pool) and How do calculate
such things?
- What platform one could use to provide this? Does FSF has anythgin
we can use or we would have to set up a website (more dev time!)?
- Can we use Agora for this? (this would be awesome) How, who can
provide the dev time?
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