Experiences with octave 1.93 on DEC-Alpha

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Experiences with octave 1.93 on DEC-Alpha

Peter Bruhn
Hi,

I have tried to compile the 1.93 sources on my DEC-Alpha running
DEC-UNIX 4.0 (formerly called DEC-OSF) using gcc 2.7.2.1

Compiling went fine (except for the glob-subdirectory, but I just
removed it, since the functions glob and fnmatch are in the standard
library anyway).

When I used octave, I got core-dumps whenever I tried to call a
command that does not exist. The problem was somewhere in the kpathsea
library. So I linked octave 1.93 with the kpathea library of octave
1.1.1. This seemed to work fine.

After using octave 1.93 for a while I found the following problems:

1. Calculations like 222^222 do not give "Inf" but "1.7977e+308".

2. fscanf does not work properly (not as documented and not as it
   works with octave 1.1.1

   Both fscanf(fnum, "%s") and fscanf(fnum, "%c") read the whole
   contents of a file, instead of just a word or just a character.

Any comments, hints, flames,... are appreciated,
Peter

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Peter Bruhn             | Department of Applied Computer Science
                        | University of Economics and Business Administration
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Experiences with octave 1.93 on DEC-Alpha

John W. Eaton-6
On  6-Dec-1996, Peter Bruhn <[hidden email]> wrote:

: 1. Calculations like 222^222 do not give "Inf" but "1.7977e+308".

IEEE floating point math is not fully supported by gcc 2.7.2 on the
DEC Alpha.  I believe this problem will be fixed with gcc 2.8.0 (the
next major release).  No, I don't know any better than anyone else
when that might be available.

: 2. fscanf does not work properly (not as documented and not as it
:    works with octave 1.1.1
:
:    Both fscanf(fnum, "%s") and fscanf(fnum, "%c") read the whole
:    contents of a file, instead of just a word or just a character.

Sorry, the documentation is lagging a bit behind.

The C-style I/O functions are now compatible with Matlab by default
(it seemed to be what people wanted).

If you want the old behavior, you can use

  fscanf (fnum, "%s", "C")

or

  fscanf (fnum, "%c", "C")


jwe