HARDCOPY

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HARDCOPY

voorrips
Hello Octave community,

I just ftp-ed the Octave binaries for Solaris - and they work!

My first try with Octave was to make a hardcopy from a simple plot.
I found that 'set term postscript' gives a black-and-white Postscript file.

My questions are:
- how do I get a color Postscript file?
- how do I get an encapsulated Postscript file?


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Re: HARDCOPY

Ted.Harding
( Re Message From: voorrips )

>
> Hello Octave community,
>
> I just ftp-ed the Octave binaries for Solaris - and they work!
>
> My first try with Octave was to make a hardcopy from a simple plot.
> I found that 'set term postscript' gives a black-and-white Postscript file.
>
> My questions are:
> - how do I get a color Postscript file?
> - how do I get an encapsulated Postscript file?

These are mainly gnuplot issues.

1. I don't know about a Colour Postscript driver for gnuplot.
   Plus, I think that octave translates colour into linestyle when sending
   to gnuplot. If there's no colour PS driver for gnuplot, it's not worth
   taking any action. If there is one, then the support m-files for the
   octave "plot" commands may need to be modified to refer to the colour
   styles. In my gnuplot, "set term postscript" puts the line
       /Color false def
   into the output.

2. "set term postscript" should produce an encapsulated Postscript file
   anyway, Check the start of the file: you should see
       %%BoundingBox: something something something something
   If that's there, then you have encapsulated Postscript.

Cheers,
Ted.                                    ([hidden email])

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Re: HARDCOPY

Friedrich Leisch-3
In reply to this post by voorrips
>>>>> On Fri, 22 Nov 1996 13:14:47 GMT,
>>>>> voorrips  wrote:

> Hello Octave community,
> I just ftp-ed the Octave binaries for Solaris - and they work!

> My first try with Octave was to make a hardcopy from a simple plot.
> I found that 'set term postscript' gives a black-and-white Postscript file.

> My questions are:
> - how do I get a color Postscript file?
> - how do I get an encapsulated Postscript file?


this is what the gnuplot help page says ... octave uses gnuplot for
all plotting, so it's probably best if you take a look at a gnuplot
manual or say 'help' after invoking gnuplot from the command line...

all gnuplot commands should be available at the octave prompt.

Have a nice weekend,
Fritz

--------8<--------8<--------8<--------8<--------8<--------


 Several options may be set in the `postscript` driver.

 Syntax:
       set terminal postscript {<mode>} {color | monochrome}
                               {solid | dashed} {<duplexing>}
                               {enhanced | noenhanced}
                               {"<fontname>"} {<fontsize>}

 where <mode> is `landscape`, `portrait`, `eps` or `default`
 `solid` draws all plots with solid lines, overriding any dashed patterns;
 <duplexing> is `defaultplex`, `simplex` or `duplex` ("duplexing" in
 PostScript is the ability of the printer to print on both sides of the same
 page---don't set this if your printer can't do it);
 `enhanced` activates the "Enhanced PostScript" features (subscripts,
 superscripts and mixed fonts);
 `"<fontname>"` is the name of a valid PostScript font; and `<fontsize>` is
 the size of the font in PostScript points.

 `default` mode sets all options to their defaults: `landscape`, `monochrome`,
 `dashed`, `defaultplex`, `noenhanced`, "Helvetica" and 14pt.
  Default size of a PostScript plot is 10 inches wide and 7 inches high.

 `eps` mode generates EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) output, which is just
 regular PostScript with some additional lines that allow the file to be
 imported into a variety of other applications.  (The added lines are
 PostScript comment lines, so the file may still be printed by itself.)  To
 get EPS output, use the `eps` mode and make only one plot per file.  In `eps`
 mode the whole plot, including the fonts, is reduced to half of the default
 size.

 Examples:
       set terminal postscript default       # old postscript
       set terminal postscript enhanced      # old enhpost
       set terminal postscript landscape 22  # old psbig
       set terminal postscript eps 14        # old epsf1
       set terminal postscript eps 22        # old epsf2
       set size 0.7,1.4; set term post portrait color "Times-Roman" 14

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