GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

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GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

Nir Krakauer-2

Please let me know if you're interested in helping evaluate applications and then mentor any accepted students.

Student applications will be due March 14-25, see https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com

--Nir
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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

Juan Pablo Carbajal-2
On Mon, Feb 29, 2016 at 9:37 PM, Nir Krakauer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Please let me know if you're interested in helping evaluate applications and
> then mentor any accepted students.
>
> Student applications will be due March 14-25, see
> https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com
>
> --Nir
Hi Nir,

I am in for sure, but I guess I can add myself.

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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

Oliver Heimlich
In reply to this post by Nir Krakauer-2
Am 29. Februar 2016 21:37:30 MEZ, schrieb Nir Krakauer <[hidden email]>:
>Please let me know if you're interested in helping evaluate
>applications
>and then mentor any accepted students.
>
>Student applications will be due March 14-25, see
>https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com
>
>--Nir

I can help with the applications and would also be interested in mentoring 1 student.

Oliver

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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

Carlo de Falco-2
In reply to this post by Nir Krakauer-2

On 29 Feb 2016, at 21:37, Nir Krakauer <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Please let me know if you're interested in helping evaluate applications and then mentor any accepted students.
>
> Student applications will be due March 14-25, see https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com
>
> --Nir

Congratulations!
I am definitely in!
c.



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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

John Swensen-3
In reply to this post by Nir Krakauer-2

On Feb 29, 2016, at 12:37 PM, Nir Krakauer <[hidden email]> wrote:


Please let me know if you're interested in helping evaluate applications and then mentor any accepted students.

Student applications will be due March 14-25, see https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com

—Nir

I haven’t been involved in Octave development a ton lately, but would like to get more involved now that I am past the grad student/postdoc days and got a faculty job. I have recently done some work with a couple of different polygon libraries and think that implementing many of the polygon functions (e.g. polybool, poly2ccw, poly2cw, poly2fv, polyjoin, polysplit, etc.) and would be something I could mentor. 

It looks like there is a partial implementation as MEX function (though not in Octave package format) at https://sites.google.com/site/ulfgri/numerical/polybool that uses both ClipperLib and GPC. I think GPC (http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/~toby/gpc/#Licensing) is out of the question because of their "free for private/hobbyist/education and non-free for products/commercial" licensing. ClipperLib (http://www.angusj.com/delphi/clipper.php) used the Boost Software License. The Boost::Geometry (https://github.com/boostorg/geometry) and Boost::Polygon (http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_60_0/libs/polygon/doc/index.htm) libraries could also be used and are license-friendly. 

Unfortunately, based on my evaluation of all three of these, GPC is by far the most robust solution that can handle self intersections and nearly parallel lines very, very well, but is likely not license-compatible with Octave. ClipperLib is the easiest to use and Boost::Geometry is the most powerful (but a bit confusing because of how much templating is going on).

Let me know if this sounds interesting and you want to add me to the list of potential mentors.

John S.

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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

Nir Krakauer-2
In reply to this post by Nir Krakauer-2
John-- Sure, I'd be happy to add you as a mentor. Could you also add a project description to http://wiki.octave.org/Summer_of_Code_Project_Ideas ?​ --Nir
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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

Juan Pablo Carbajal-2
In reply to this post by John Swensen-3
On Tue, Mar 1, 2016 at 3:04 PM, John Swensen <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> On Feb 29, 2016, at 12:37 PM, Nir Krakauer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>
> Please let me know if you're interested in helping evaluate applications and
> then mentor any accepted students.
>
> Student applications will be due March 14-25, see
> https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com
>
> —Nir
>
>
> I haven’t been involved in Octave development a ton lately, but would like
> to get more involved now that I am past the grad student/postdoc days and
> got a faculty job. I have recently done some work with a couple of different
> polygon libraries and think that implementing many of the polygon functions
> (e.g. polybool, poly2ccw, poly2cw, poly2fv, polyjoin, polysplit, etc.) and
> would be something I could mentor.
>
> It looks like there is a partial implementation as MEX function (though not
> in Octave package format) at
> https://sites.google.com/site/ulfgri/numerical/polybool that uses both
> ClipperLib and GPC. I think GPC
> (http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/~toby/gpc/#Licensing) is out of the question
> because of their "free for private/hobbyist/education and non-free for
> products/commercial" licensing. ClipperLib
> (http://www.angusj.com/delphi/clipper.php) used the Boost Software License.
> The Boost::Geometry (https://github.com/boostorg/geometry) and
> Boost::Polygon
> (http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_60_0/libs/polygon/doc/index.htm) libraries
> could also be used and are license-friendly.
>
> Unfortunately, based on my evaluation of all three of these, GPC is by far
> the most robust solution that can handle self intersections and nearly
> parallel lines very, very well, but is likely not license-compatible with
> Octave. ClipperLib is the easiest to use and Boost::Geometry is the most
> powerful (but a bit confusing because of how much templating is going on).
>
> Let me know if this sounds interesting and you want to add me to the list of
> potential mentors.
>
> John S.
>
John S.
It sounds like a good project. do you think it is possible to put it
as an improvement of the package geometry? There are some of the
functions already there, but as m-files, maybe we can .oct some of
those.

Also Philip Nienhuis had some ideas about the clipping library that I
haven't had time to test.

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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

John Swensen-3

> On Mar 1, 2016, at 6:35 AM, Juan Pablo Carbajal <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> On Tue, Mar 1, 2016 at 3:04 PM, John Swensen <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> On Feb 29, 2016, at 12:37 PM, Nir Krakauer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Please let me know if you're interested in helping evaluate applications and
>> then mentor any accepted students.
>>
>> Student applications will be due March 14-25, see
>> https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com
>>
>> —Nir
>>
>>
>> I haven’t been involved in Octave development a ton lately, but would like
>> to get more involved now that I am past the grad student/postdoc days and
>> got a faculty job. I have recently done some work with a couple of different
>> polygon libraries and think that implementing many of the polygon functions
>> (e.g. polybool, poly2ccw, poly2cw, poly2fv, polyjoin, polysplit, etc.) and
>> would be something I could mentor.
>>
>> It looks like there is a partial implementation as MEX function (though not
>> in Octave package format) at
>> https://sites.google.com/site/ulfgri/numerical/polybool that uses both
>> ClipperLib and GPC. I think GPC
>> (http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/~toby/gpc/#Licensing) is out of the question
>> because of their "free for private/hobbyist/education and non-free for
>> products/commercial" licensing. ClipperLib
>> (http://www.angusj.com/delphi/clipper.php) used the Boost Software License.
>> The Boost::Geometry (https://github.com/boostorg/geometry) and
>> Boost::Polygon
>> (http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_60_0/libs/polygon/doc/index.htm) libraries
>> could also be used and are license-friendly.
>>
>> Unfortunately, based on my evaluation of all three of these, GPC is by far
>> the most robust solution that can handle self intersections and nearly
>> parallel lines very, very well, but is likely not license-compatible with
>> Octave. ClipperLib is the easiest to use and Boost::Geometry is the most
>> powerful (but a bit confusing because of how much templating is going on).
>>
>> Let me know if this sounds interesting and you want to add me to the list of
>> potential mentors.
>>
>> John S.
>>
> John S.
> It sounds like a good project. do you think it is possible to put it
> as an improvement of the package geometry? There are some of the
> functions already there, but as m-files, maybe we can .oct some of
> those.
>
> Also Philip Nienhuis had some ideas about the clipping library that I
> haven't had time to test.

It definitely could be incorporated into the geometry package, as that seems the most logical place to put it. However, I think we should have the student aiming for the Matlab-compatible functions of polybool, ispolycw, poly2ccw, poly2cw, poly2fv, polyjoin, and polysplit. These could either be implemented used the various polygon function already existent in the Geometry package, or could use one of the existing polygon libraries with an amenable license.

John S.




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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

Juan Pablo Carbajal-2
On Tue, Mar 1, 2016 at 10:44 PM, John Swensen <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>> On Mar 1, 2016, at 6:35 AM, Juan Pablo Carbajal <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> On Tue, Mar 1, 2016 at 3:04 PM, John Swensen <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> On Feb 29, 2016, at 12:37 PM, Nir Krakauer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> Please let me know if you're interested in helping evaluate applications and
>>> then mentor any accepted students.
>>>
>>> Student applications will be due March 14-25, see
>>> https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com
>>>
>>> —Nir
>>>
>>>
>>> I haven’t been involved in Octave development a ton lately, but would like
>>> to get more involved now that I am past the grad student/postdoc days and
>>> got a faculty job. I have recently done some work with a couple of different
>>> polygon libraries and think that implementing many of the polygon functions
>>> (e.g. polybool, poly2ccw, poly2cw, poly2fv, polyjoin, polysplit, etc.) and
>>> would be something I could mentor.
>>>
>>> It looks like there is a partial implementation as MEX function (though not
>>> in Octave package format) at
>>> https://sites.google.com/site/ulfgri/numerical/polybool that uses both
>>> ClipperLib and GPC. I think GPC
>>> (http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/~toby/gpc/#Licensing) is out of the question
>>> because of their "free for private/hobbyist/education and non-free for
>>> products/commercial" licensing. ClipperLib
>>> (http://www.angusj.com/delphi/clipper.php) used the Boost Software License.
>>> The Boost::Geometry (https://github.com/boostorg/geometry) and
>>> Boost::Polygon
>>> (http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_60_0/libs/polygon/doc/index.htm) libraries
>>> could also be used and are license-friendly.
>>>
>>> Unfortunately, based on my evaluation of all three of these, GPC is by far
>>> the most robust solution that can handle self intersections and nearly
>>> parallel lines very, very well, but is likely not license-compatible with
>>> Octave. ClipperLib is the easiest to use and Boost::Geometry is the most
>>> powerful (but a bit confusing because of how much templating is going on).
>>>
>>> Let me know if this sounds interesting and you want to add me to the list of
>>> potential mentors.
>>>
>>> John S.
>>>
>> John S.
>> It sounds like a good project. do you think it is possible to put it
>> as an improvement of the package geometry? There are some of the
>> functions already there, but as m-files, maybe we can .oct some of
>> those.
>>
>> Also Philip Nienhuis had some ideas about the clipping library that I
>> haven't had time to test.
>
> It definitely could be incorporated into the geometry package, as that seems the most logical place to put it. However, I think we should have the student aiming for the Matlab-compatible functions of polybool, ispolycw, poly2ccw, poly2cw, poly2fv, polyjoin, and polysplit. These could either be implemented used the various polygon function already existent in the Geometry package, or could use one of the existing polygon libraries with an amenable license.
>
> John S.
>
>
>
Ok, I understand, these functions are already in matlab so the place
to put them is definitely in core in the package geometry there. No
need to mix it with the forge package geometry.

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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

John Swensen-3

> On Mar 1, 2016, at 2:27 PM, Juan Pablo Carbajal <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> On Tue, Mar 1, 2016 at 10:44 PM, John Swensen <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> On Mar 1, 2016, at 6:35 AM, Juan Pablo Carbajal <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> On Tue, Mar 1, 2016 at 3:04 PM, John Swensen <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> On Feb 29, 2016, at 12:37 PM, Nir Krakauer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Please let me know if you're interested in helping evaluate applications and
>>>> then mentor any accepted students.
>>>>
>>>> Student applications will be due March 14-25, see
>>>> https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com
>>>>
>>>> —Nir
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I haven’t been involved in Octave development a ton lately, but would like
>>>> to get more involved now that I am past the grad student/postdoc days and
>>>> got a faculty job. I have recently done some work with a couple of different
>>>> polygon libraries and think that implementing many of the polygon functions
>>>> (e.g. polybool, poly2ccw, poly2cw, poly2fv, polyjoin, polysplit, etc.) and
>>>> would be something I could mentor.
>>>>
>>>> It looks like there is a partial implementation as MEX function (though not
>>>> in Octave package format) at
>>>> https://sites.google.com/site/ulfgri/numerical/polybool that uses both
>>>> ClipperLib and GPC. I think GPC
>>>> (http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/~toby/gpc/#Licensing) is out of the question
>>>> because of their "free for private/hobbyist/education and non-free for
>>>> products/commercial" licensing. ClipperLib
>>>> (http://www.angusj.com/delphi/clipper.php) used the Boost Software License.
>>>> The Boost::Geometry (https://github.com/boostorg/geometry) and
>>>> Boost::Polygon
>>>> (http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_60_0/libs/polygon/doc/index.htm) libraries
>>>> could also be used and are license-friendly.
>>>>
>>>> Unfortunately, based on my evaluation of all three of these, GPC is by far
>>>> the most robust solution that can handle self intersections and nearly
>>>> parallel lines very, very well, but is likely not license-compatible with
>>>> Octave. ClipperLib is the easiest to use and Boost::Geometry is the most
>>>> powerful (but a bit confusing because of how much templating is going on).
>>>>
>>>> Let me know if this sounds interesting and you want to add me to the list of
>>>> potential mentors.
>>>>
>>>> John S.
>>>>
>>> John S.
>>> It sounds like a good project. do you think it is possible to put it
>>> as an improvement of the package geometry? There are some of the
>>> functions already there, but as m-files, maybe we can .oct some of
>>> those.
>>>
>>> Also Philip Nienhuis had some ideas about the clipping library that I
>>> haven't had time to test.
>>
>> It definitely could be incorporated into the geometry package, as that seems the most logical place to put it. However, I think we should have the student aiming for the Matlab-compatible functions of polybool, ispolycw, poly2ccw, poly2cw, poly2fv, polyjoin, and polysplit. These could either be implemented used the various polygon function already existent in the Geometry package, or could use one of the existing polygon libraries with an amenable license.
>>
>> John S.
>>
>>
>>
> Ok, I understand, these functions are already in matlab so the place
> to put them is definitely in core in the package geometry there. No
> need to mix it with the forge package geometry.


Who can grant me Wiki access so I can add it to the GSoC suggested projects page?

John S.
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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

PhilipNienhuis
In reply to this post by John Swensen-3
John Swensen-3 wrote
> On Feb 29, 2016, at 12:37 PM, Nir Krakauer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>
> Please let me know if you're interested in helping evaluate applications and then mentor any accepted students.
>
> Student applications will be due March 14-25, see https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com <https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com/>
>
> —Nir

I haven’t been involved in Octave development a ton lately, but would like to get more involved now that I am past the grad student/postdoc days and got a faculty job. I have recently done some work with a couple of different polygon libraries and think that implementing many of the polygon functions (e.g. polybool, poly2ccw, poly2cw, poly2fv, polyjoin, polysplit, etc.) and would be something I could mentor.

It looks like there is a partial implementation as MEX function (though not in Octave package format) at https://sites.google.com/site/ulfgri/numerical/polybool <https://sites.google.com/site/ulfgri/numerical/polybool> that uses both ClipperLib and GPC. I think GPC (http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/~toby/gpc/#Licensing <http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/~toby/gpc/#Licensing>) is out of the question because of their "free for private/hobbyist/education and non-free for products/commercial" licensing. ClipperLib (http://www.angusj.com/delphi/clipper.php <http://www.angusj.com/delphi/clipper.php>) used the Boost Software License. The Boost::Geometry (https://github.com/boostorg/geometry <https://github.com/boostorg/geometry>) and Boost::Polygon (http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_60_0/libs/polygon/doc/index.htm <http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_60_0/libs/polygon/doc/index.htm>) libraries could also be used and are license-friendly.

Unfortunately, based on my evaluation of all three of these, GPC is by far the most robust solution that can handle self intersections and nearly parallel lines very, very well, but is likely not license-compatible with Octave. ClipperLib is the easiest to use and Boost::Geometry is the most powerful (but a bit confusing because of how much templating is going on).
As Juanpi mentioned, I found a few more options. E.g., have a look here:

http://boolean.klaasholwerda.nl/bool.html

AFAICS it is a fairly complete library and it is GPL.

I 'd like to use polygon clipping for the mapping package, to reduce large GIS shapefiles to a more manageable size. Currently I use oc_polybool() in OF octclip, but:
1. That doesn't seem to handle polygons with holes very well;
2. It doesn't build anymore with the very latest Octave dev sources (AFAICS);
3. I also need to (linearly) interpolate Z- (and M-) values based on clipping in the horizontal (XY) plane. With oc_polybool(), but with many other libraries as well, that is a pain as one needs to reconstruct ratios based on clipping points on the polygon sides;
4. Juanpi mentioned that the octclip maintainer isn't interested in parallelization (openmpi). I haven't met the need for that yet but I can imagine that in the future parallel clipping of sets of polygons may come in handy.

In (much) later stages I'm also interested in 3D-clipping.

As to GSOC, I have no time for mentoring but I can jump in on ad-hoc basis.

Philip
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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

Nir Krakauer-2
In reply to this post by Juan Pablo Carbajal-2

On Wed, Mar 2, 2016 at 8:31 AM, John Swensen <[hidden email]> wrote:
Who can grant me Wiki access so I can add it to the GSoC suggested projects page?

John S.

I think that jwe or Jordi should be able to help you.
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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

CdeMills
In reply to this post by Nir Krakauer-2
Nir Krakauer-2 wrote
Please let me know if you're interested in helping evaluate applications
and then mentor any accepted students.

Student applications will be due March 14-25, see
https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com

--Nir
Nir,

I propose myself as secondary mentor, i.e. helping the main mentor on one project.

Regards

Pascal
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Re: GNU Octave has been accepted as a GSoC 2016 mentor organization

CdeMills
CdeMills wrote
Nir,

I propose myself as secondary mentor, i.e. helping the main mentor on one project.

Regards
Sorry, forgot to tell ... I'll be away from July 22th to August 22th. This is why I propose to act as secondary mentor with main duties before July 22th

Regards

Pascal