Octave web update

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Octave web update

Mike Miller
All,

Does anyone have any ideas on the status of the Octave web redesign
that was started by Wendy a year and a half ago [1]? Looking for
opinions, plans that were talked about at the time, what else needed
to be done before it could be used…

I think it's a great update to the web site, and it would look really
good if it could be launched at (roughly) the same time as the
upcoming 4.0 release!

I am interested in helping to move this forward (when I'm not looking
at audio and build configuration bugs for 4.0). To start, I'll host
what we have so far so people can look at it, and work on easy fixes
(broken links, missing pages, missing text, etc).

I'll follow up here when I have the site somewhere public, but I
wanted to get some early feedback and see if anyone remembers the
project at the time and what needs to happen before we can use it.

Especially jwe, since I suppose you're the one who updates the web
site now. Any special considerations with how the web site needs to be
deployed on gnu.org? Is it, or can it be tied to a version control
repo (auto-build-and-publish on hg push)?

[1] https://github.com/dellsystem/octave.org

Thanks,

--
mike

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Re: Octave web update

Jordi Gutiérrez Hermoso-2
On Fri, 2015-02-20 at 12:13 -0500, Mike Miller wrote:
> I think it's a great update to the web site, and it would look
> really good if it could be launched at (roughly) the same time as
> the upcoming 4.0 release!

I was thinking of that too. I would like this to happen. With a link
to the Windows download and vague promises that Mac OS X binaries will
be coming "soon". And screenshots. And donation buttons.

> Especially jwe, since I suppose you're the one who updates the web
> site now.

The web site is actually a CVS repo:

    https://savannah.gnu.org/cvs/?group=octave

I believe that all of us with Octave membership on Savannah actually
have the ability to edit this repo and hence edit our web pages.

- Jordi G. H.







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Re: Octave web update

Mike Miller
On Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 12:57:25 -0500, Jordi Gutiérrez Hermoso wrote:
> The web site is actually a CVS repo:
>
>     https://savannah.gnu.org/cvs/?group=octave
>
> I believe that all of us with Octave membership on Savannah actually
> have the ability to edit this repo and hence edit our web pages.

Ah, ok. Yes, looks like I can at least check out, thanks. So committing
to cvs updates the site automatically? Does the root directory of the
cvs repo have to be the root directory of the site? Does it have to be
cvs? :)

I now have the new web site design running at

  https://mtmxr.com/octave-beta/

Please take a look everyone, let me know what needs to be fixed, what
you like and don't like, etc. Yes, there are some broken links, and the
news items are way out of date. I'll be hacking on this and updating it
periodically.

--
mike

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Re: Octave web update

Juan Pablo Carbajal-2
On Sat, Feb 21, 2015 at 4:27 AM, Mike Miller <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 12:57:25 -0500, Jordi Gutiérrez Hermoso wrote:
>> The web site is actually a CVS repo:
>>
>>     https://savannah.gnu.org/cvs/?group=octave
>>
>> I believe that all of us with Octave membership on Savannah actually
>> have the ability to edit this repo and hence edit our web pages.
>
> Ah, ok. Yes, looks like I can at least check out, thanks. So committing
> to cvs updates the site automatically? Does the root directory of the
> cvs repo have to be the root directory of the site? Does it have to be
> cvs? :)
>
> I now have the new web site design running at
>
>   https://mtmxr.com/octave-beta/
>
> Please take a look everyone, let me know what needs to be fixed, what
> you like and don't like, etc. Yes, there are some broken links, and the
> news items are way out of date. I'll be hacking on this and updating it
> periodically.
>
> --
> mike
>

Mike,

Thanks alot. I am not sure exactly what kind of comments you are
looking for. I just read the content and did not find much things to
change, indeed only this small suggestion. In the sentence
"You should also not be surprised when your requests for help are ignored."
in the "right expectations section" I would write
"You should also not be surprised if your requests for help are ignored."

I will keep checking the site.

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Re: Octave web update

bpabbott
Administrator
In reply to this post by Mike Miller
> On Feb 20, 2015, at 22:27, Mike Miller <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>> On Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 12:57:25 -0500, Jordi Gutiérrez Hermoso wrote:
>> The web site is actually a CVS repo:
>>
>>    https://savannah.gnu.org/cvs/?group=octave
>>
>> I believe that all of us with Octave membership on Savannah actually
>> have the ability to edit this repo and hence edit our web pages.
>
> Ah, ok. Yes, looks like I can at least check out, thanks. So committing
> to cvs updates the site automatically? Does the root directory of the
> cvs repo have to be the root directory of the site? Does it have to be
> cvs? :)
>
> I now have the new web site design running at
>
>  https://mtmxr.com/octave-beta/
>
> Please take a look everyone, let me know what needs to be fixed, what
> you like and don't like, etc. Yes, there are some broken links, and the
> news items are way out of date. I'll be hacking on this and updating it
> periodically.
This what I see in Safari/iPhone




I assume there is a formatting problem?

Ben

image1.PNG (391K) Download Attachment
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Re: Octave web update

Carnë Draug
On 21 February 2015 at 13:45, Ben Abbott <[hidden email]> wrote:

>> On Feb 20, 2015, at 22:27, Mike Miller <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> On Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 12:57:25 -0500, Jordi Gutiérrez Hermoso wrote:
>>> The web site is actually a CVS repo:
>>>
>>>    https://savannah.gnu.org/cvs/?group=octave
>>>
>>> I believe that all of us with Octave membership on Savannah actually
>>> have the ability to edit this repo and hence edit our web pages.
>>
>> Ah, ok. Yes, looks like I can at least check out, thanks. So committing
>> to cvs updates the site automatically? Does the root directory of the
>> cvs repo have to be the root directory of the site? Does it have to be
>> cvs? :)
>>
>> I now have the new web site design running at
>>
>>  https://mtmxr.com/octave-beta/
>>
>> Please take a look everyone, let me know what needs to be fixed, what
>> you like and don't like, etc. Yes, there are some broken links, and the
>> news items are way out of date. I'll be hacking on this and updating it
>> periodically.
>
> This what I see in Safari/iPhone
>
> I assume there is a formatting problem?

I have a similar formatting problems with chrome on a mobile
phone. The current website displays perfectly though.

But even in a desktop, I don't really think the new design is better
than the current one. What problem exactly is the new design trying
to solve?

The main part of the website that I think we could improve is the
manual [1]. Would be nice to have a page for each function,
a search box, and make available the documentation for older
versions.

Carnë

[1] https://www.gnu.org/software/octave/doc/interpreter/

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Re: Octave web update

rocketsound
In reply to this post by Mike Miller
My first impression is really good and some improvements came into my mind (I hope that's also the kind of feedback you expect): IMO one of the biggest problems of Octave concerning public visibility is that a lot of people (especially students/"post-students" who only worked with Matlab yet) have no idea what Octave is and _way_ more importantly don't know how powerful it is and that it actually is mostly Matlab-compatible. Some of them heard about it but think of it like a rusty unstable piece of code that is for scientific freaks only. Additionally, most people/students I introduced to Octave don't understand the purpose of Octave-Forge and that they can expand Octave's core functionality with the packages hosted there. The new website should take care of both these points and make them _more_ clear.

I created a prototype that takes care of both points I described above (see the attachment) and extended the front page a little bit. Note that I'm by no means a "capable" designer, it's just how I would change the design the front page.

I also noticed that the text "Octave is normally used through its interactive command line interface, but it can also be used to write non-interactive programs." on the original front page is now outdated.

DesignPrototype.pdf
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Re: Octave web update

Richard Crozier
In reply to this post by Carnë Draug


On 21/02/15 15:11, Carnë Draug wrote:
> On 21 February 2015 at 13:45, Ben Abbott <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> On Feb 20, 2015, at 22:27, Mike Miller <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 12:57:25 -0500, Jordi Gutiérrez Hermoso wrote:
>>>> The web site is actually a CVS repo:
>>>>

>
> But even in a desktop, I don't really think the new design is better
> than the current one. What problem exactly is the new design trying
> to solve?
>

Marketing? Not a problem if you don't care if anyone uses Octave I suppose.

The new website makes it look like the project is well supported,
including by a wider community than just the core developers working on
the code. This gives confidence to new users in the viability and
continuation of the project, for which the website is the first point of
contact with the project.

It is an unfortunate fact of the world that if you care about people
using your software you have to make pretty pictures and stuff to
advertise it. It gives the 'feel' of a project that's not just going to
disappear to new users, particularly enterprise, if this is a market you
are interested in. Unfortunately it's just not enough for the product
itself to be great.

The newer website looks amazing and was clearly produced by someone who
knows how to make a great (and professional) looking site. I for one
think use should be made of the fantastic effort, rather than throw it
in the bin and discourage anyone else with the relevant skills bothering
to help in the future?

Just my thoughts,
Richard



--
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
Scotland, with registration number SC005336.


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Re: Octave web update

Carnë Draug
On 26 February 2015 at 08:32, Richard Crozier <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>
> On 21/02/15 15:11, Carnë Draug wrote:
>>
>> On 21 February 2015 at 13:45, Ben Abbott <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> On Feb 20, 2015, at 22:27, Mike Miller <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 12:57:25 -0500, Jordi Gutiérrez Hermoso wrote:
>>>>> The web site is actually a CVS repo:
>>>>>
>
>>
>> But even in a desktop, I don't really think the new design is better
>> than the current one. What problem exactly is the new design trying
>> to solve?
>>
>
> Marketing? Not a problem if you don't care if anyone uses Octave I suppose.
>
> The new website makes it look like the project is well supported, including
> by a wider community than just the core developers working on the code. This
> gives confidence to new users in the viability and continuation of the
> project, for which the website is the first point of contact with the
> project.
>
> It is an unfortunate fact of the world that if you care about people using
> your software you have to make pretty pictures and stuff to advertise it. It
> gives the 'feel' of a project that's not just going to disappear to new
> users, particularly enterprise, if this is a market you are interested in.
> Unfortunately it's just not enough for the product itself to be great.
>
> The newer website looks amazing and was clearly produced by someone who
> knows how to make a great (and professional) looking site. I for one think
> use should be made of the fantastic effort, rather than throw it in the bin
> and discourage anyone else with the relevant skills bothering to help in the
> future?

I guess you missunderstood my question.  My question was not why do we need
a fancy and professional looking website.  My question was what on the
current website is the problem? What design choices are we talking about?
Because I don't really see the new one as looking better than the other.

Compare the support [1, 2] and get involved pages [3, 4]?  The new one has
a top bar instead of a side bar, much bigger fonts, and a blue top instead
of white.  Which of these make it look more professional?  I just don't
see it.

So on my question "What problem exactly is the new design trying to solve?"
please be more objective.  The new proposed website has a textwidth that I
feel is too wide and makes it hard to read (I have a 23' screen with
resolution 1920x1080).  The old one did not had this problem.  The text lines
are also fixed and do not adjust with the window size (like wikipedia does
for example).

Also, the new website has this blue background with square lines, with the
text on a white canvas.  Scrolling moves the canvas but not the background.
Because of this scrolling then becomes weird near the top and the bottom of
the page because you are not really scrolling the page.  It's unconfortable
the feeling that the page itself is reshaping.

I know design is a lot of personal opinion and taste but you need to be
able to point the problems to improve.  "Make it look more professional"
is not good, what is wrong with the current one that causes it to not look
professional?  And does the new website addresses this problems?

Carnë

[1] https://www.gnu.org/software/octave/support.html
[2] https://mtmxr.com/octave-beta/support/
[3] https://www.gnu.org/software/octave/get-involved.html
[4] https://mtmxr.com/octave-beta/get-involved/

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Re: Octave web update

Daniel Sebald
On 02/26/2015 08:50 AM, Carnë Draug wrote:

> On 26 February 2015 at 08:32, Richard Crozier<[hidden email]>  wrote:
>>
>>
>> On 21/02/15 15:11, Carnë Draug wrote:
>>>
>>> On 21 February 2015 at 13:45, Ben Abbott<[hidden email]>  wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> On Feb 20, 2015, at 22:27, Mike Miller<[hidden email]>  wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 12:57:25 -0500, Jordi Gutiérrez Hermoso wrote:
>>>>>> The web site is actually a CVS repo:
>>>>>>
>>
>>>
>>> But even in a desktop, I don't really think the new design is better
>>> than the current one. What problem exactly is the new design trying
>>> to solve?
>>>
>>
>> Marketing? Not a problem if you don't care if anyone uses Octave I suppose.
>>
>> The new website makes it look like the project is well supported, including
>> by a wider community than just the core developers working on the code. This
>> gives confidence to new users in the viability and continuation of the
>> project, for which the website is the first point of contact with the
>> project.
>>
>> It is an unfortunate fact of the world that if you care about people using
>> your software you have to make pretty pictures and stuff to advertise it. It
>> gives the 'feel' of a project that's not just going to disappear to new
>> users, particularly enterprise, if this is a market you are interested in.
>> Unfortunately it's just not enough for the product itself to be great.
>>
>> The newer website looks amazing and was clearly produced by someone who
>> knows how to make a great (and professional) looking site. I for one think
>> use should be made of the fantastic effort, rather than throw it in the bin
>> and discourage anyone else with the relevant skills bothering to help in the
>> future?
>
> I guess you missunderstood my question.  My question was not why do we need
> a fancy and professional looking website.  My question was what on the
> current website is the problem? What design choices are we talking about?
> Because I don't really see the new one as looking better than the other.
>
> Compare the support [1, 2] and get involved pages [3, 4]?  The new one has
> a top bar instead of a side bar, much bigger fonts, and a blue top instead
> of white.  Which of these make it look more professional?  I just don't
> see it.
>
> So on my question "What problem exactly is the new design trying to solve?"
> please be more objective.  The new proposed website has a textwidth that I
> feel is too wide and makes it hard to read (I have a 23' screen with
> resolution 1920x1080).  The old one did not had this problem.  The text lines
> are also fixed and do not adjust with the window size (like wikipedia does
> for example).
>
> Also, the new website has this blue background with square lines, with the
> text on a white canvas.  Scrolling moves the canvas but not the background.
> Because of this scrolling then becomes weird near the top and the bottom of
> the page because you are not really scrolling the page.  It's unconfortable
> the feeling that the page itself is reshaping.
>
> I know design is a lot of personal opinion and taste but you need to be
> able to point the problems to improve.  "Make it look more professional"
> is not good, what is wrong with the current one that causes it to not look
> professional?  And does the new website addresses this problems?

I guess I'm with Carnë on this one.  The look of the proposed new
website is fine, but it isn't drastically better than the current
website, which I'm OK with.  That's not to discourage a new design,
especially if that design is more maintainable because of some webpage
layout software that makes it easy.  (I know little about how webpages
are done these days.)  However, I think it is a bit too near V4.0 to
move to a whole new design, especially when V4.0 itself is still taking
shape.

For my taste, the proposed website has one or two nice elements, say the
CAD-like blue background, but the fonts are too big and the main page is
too minimalist.  I don't know where this trend started (maybe it ushered
in with the iPod/handheld wave) but Fedora's webpage moved to this
minimalist approach where all one sees is a bunch of feel-good photos.
Where years ago it used to be screenshots, lists of software packages,
discussions, road map, and so on, now Fedora's webpage is just a few
sales slogans and "Download Now" buttons.  Perhaps developers went that
direction because of how often they update version numbers these days,
don't know.  The Gnome 3 environment falls in the same category.
Presenting an overload of info is always a danger, but so is presenting
too little.

That said, there could be plenty of work on the webpage for V4.0 because
the webpage doesn't quite convey where V4.0 is headed.  Three things I'd
like to see are

1) Actual Downloading
2) List/table of supported platforms (could be combined with download
buttons) along with screentshots and possibly version number of the most
stable version.
3) A description of the graphics toolkits options

Downloading:  The issue with the current "Download" page is that there
isn't anything there that actually downloads the software.  It merely
tells one where to go look for the software.  That's fine for me, but
probably not for a new user.  It would be nice if the link for, say,
SuSE actually brought up the SuSE installation application with the
correct RPM.  I'm sure it is a lot of effort to maintain a Download
page--for example, how is installation going to be dealt with on a
system vs. user basis?  Maybe have one button for SuSE System and one
button for SuSE User?

List of Supported Platforms:  It seems one of the big 4.0
accomplishments is compiling on different platforms.  There are
different hardware platforms, and different OS platforms upon those
hardware platforms from the discussions I've seen.  Mac OS X, Mac Lion,
Cygwin, WinGW, wasn't there someone who compiled Octave for an App or
something?  If someone using each of the platforms updated the download
link and screenshots on occasion, that's adequate.  As another category,
include some screenshots of the legacy CLI version of the software (just
linux, and that's already present on the main page of the current
webpage).  Why version number per platform?  Because I think there
really is some utility to branching per platform if that branch is kept
away from stable/development.

Graphics Toolkits:  Just as with the platforms, it would be nice to
convey info about the options with FLTK, gnuplot and Qt packages.  Some
screenshots on Linux would do along with a description of the benefit of
each (e.g., the gnuplot package gives appealing graphics output).  I
think this is very beneficial to those who don't know what the options
are and to those who want to utilize what they have in the past.

In other words, I like a webpage to provide a little guided tour of the
software and know what my options are before I go through the effort of
installing or choosing a machine on which to install.

Dan

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Re: Octave web update

Oliver Heimlich
Am 27.02.2015 um 07:22 schrieb Daniel J Sebald:

> On 02/26/2015 08:50 AM, Carnë Draug wrote:
>> On 26 February 2015 at 08:32, Richard Crozier<[hidden email]>  wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> On 21/02/15 15:11, Carnë Draug wrote:
>>>>
>>>> On 21 February 2015 at 13:45, Ben Abbott<[hidden email]>  wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On Feb 20, 2015, at 22:27, Mike Miller<[hidden email]>  wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 12:57:25 -0500, Jordi Gutiérrez Hermoso
>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>> The web site is actually a CVS repo:
>>>>>>>
>>>
>>>>
>>>> But even in a desktop, I don't really think the new design is better
>>>> than the current one. What problem exactly is the new design trying
>>>> to solve?
>>>>
>>>
>>> Marketing? Not a problem if you don't care if anyone uses Octave I
>>> suppose.
>>>
>>> The new website makes it look like the project is well supported,
>>> including
>>> by a wider community than just the core developers working on the
>>> code. This
>>> gives confidence to new users in the viability and continuation of the
>>> project, for which the website is the first point of contact with the
>>> project.
>>>
>>> It is an unfortunate fact of the world that if you care about people
>>> using
>>> your software you have to make pretty pictures and stuff to advertise
>>> it. It
>>> gives the 'feel' of a project that's not just going to disappear to new
>>> users, particularly enterprise, if this is a market you are
>>> interested in.
>>> Unfortunately it's just not enough for the product itself to be great.
>>>
>>> The newer website looks amazing and was clearly produced by someone who
>>> knows how to make a great (and professional) looking site. I for one
>>> think
>>> use should be made of the fantastic effort, rather than throw it in
>>> the bin
>>> and discourage anyone else with the relevant skills bothering to help
>>> in the
>>> future?
>>
>> I guess you missunderstood my question.  My question was not why do we
>> need
>> a fancy and professional looking website.  My question was what on the
>> current website is the problem? What design choices are we talking about?
>> Because I don't really see the new one as looking better than the other.
>>
>> Compare the support [1, 2] and get involved pages [3, 4]?  The new one
>> has
>> a top bar instead of a side bar, much bigger fonts, and a blue top
>> instead
>> of white.  Which of these make it look more professional?  I just don't
>> see it.
>>
>> So on my question "What problem exactly is the new design trying to
>> solve?"
>> please be more objective.  The new proposed website has a textwidth
>> that I
>> feel is too wide and makes it hard to read (I have a 23' screen with
>> resolution 1920x1080).  The old one did not had this problem.  The
>> text lines
>> are also fixed and do not adjust with the window size (like wikipedia
>> does
>> for example).
>>
>> Also, the new website has this blue background with square lines, with
>> the
>> text on a white canvas.  Scrolling moves the canvas but not the
>> background.
>> Because of this scrolling then becomes weird near the top and the
>> bottom of
>> the page because you are not really scrolling the page.  It's
>> unconfortable
>> the feeling that the page itself is reshaping.
>>
>> I know design is a lot of personal opinion and taste but you need to be
>> able to point the problems to improve.  "Make it look more professional"
>> is not good, what is wrong with the current one that causes it to not
>> look
>> professional?  And does the new website addresses this problems?
>
> I guess I'm with Carnë on this one.  The look of the proposed new
> website is fine, but it isn't drastically better than the current
> website, which I'm OK with.  That's not to discourage a new design,
> especially if that design is more maintainable because of some webpage
> layout software that makes it easy.  (I know little about how webpages
> are done these days.)  However, I think it is a bit too near V4.0 to
> move to a whole new design, especially when V4.0 itself is still taking
> shape.
>
> For my taste, the proposed website has one or two nice elements, say the
> CAD-like blue background, but the fonts are too big and the main page is
> too minimalist.  I don't know where this trend started (maybe it ushered
> in with the iPod/handheld wave) but Fedora's webpage moved to this
> minimalist approach where all one sees is a bunch of feel-good photos.
> Where years ago it used to be screenshots, lists of software packages,
> discussions, road map, and so on, now Fedora's webpage is just a few
> sales slogans and "Download Now" buttons.  Perhaps developers went that
> direction because of how often they update version numbers these days,
> don't know.  The Gnome 3 environment falls in the same category.
> Presenting an overload of info is always a danger, but so is presenting
> too little.
>
> That said, there could be plenty of work on the webpage for V4.0 because
> the webpage doesn't quite convey where V4.0 is headed.  Three things I'd
> like to see are
>
> 1) Actual Downloading
> 2) List/table of supported platforms (could be combined with download
> buttons) along with screentshots and possibly version number of the most
> stable version.
> 3) A description of the graphics toolkits options
>
> Downloading:  The issue with the current "Download" page is that there
> isn't anything there that actually downloads the software.  It merely
> tells one where to go look for the software.  That's fine for me, but
> probably not for a new user.  It would be nice if the link for, say,
> SuSE actually brought up the SuSE installation application with the
> correct RPM.  I'm sure it is a lot of effort to maintain a Download
> page--for example, how is installation going to be dealt with on a
> system vs. user basis?  Maybe have one button for SuSE System and one
> button for SuSE User?
>
> List of Supported Platforms:  It seems one of the big 4.0
> accomplishments is compiling on different platforms.  There are
> different hardware platforms, and different OS platforms upon those
> hardware platforms from the discussions I've seen.  Mac OS X, Mac Lion,
> Cygwin, WinGW, wasn't there someone who compiled Octave for an App or
> something?  If someone using each of the platforms updated the download
> link and screenshots on occasion, that's adequate.  As another category,
> include some screenshots of the legacy CLI version of the software (just
> linux, and that's already present on the main page of the current
> webpage).  Why version number per platform?  Because I think there
> really is some utility to branching per platform if that branch is kept
> away from stable/development.
>
> Graphics Toolkits:  Just as with the platforms, it would be nice to
> convey info about the options with FLTK, gnuplot and Qt packages.  Some
> screenshots on Linux would do along with a description of the benefit of
> each (e.g., the gnuplot package gives appealing graphics output).  I
> think this is very beneficial to those who don't know what the options
> are and to those who want to utilize what they have in the past.
>
> In other words, I like a webpage to provide a little guided tour of the
> software and know what my options are before I go through the effort of
> installing or choosing a machine on which to install.
>
> Dan
>

My 2 cents:

  - I like the general impression of the new design. The fist page looks
modern and the color theme and font are great!
  - The screenshots suggested by Dan should be presented. I like to look
at those when looking for new software. As a user, the screenshots give
me a good impression, whether the software is up-to-date and I am going
to be able to use it. After the 4.0 release we should have plenty of
high quality material to show off.
  - Home page: The home page is for users who are new to GNU Octave. We
have to document what can be done with GNU Octave (like Dan said), as it
is currently written in the first paragraph of the old site and is
completely missing on the beta site. I suggest to improve the paragraph
from the old website by adding more “marketing style / buzzword bingo”.
The latter could be linked to details on subpages. Just to give an idea:

    GNU Octave is a high-level language for numerical computations, data
analysis and visualization. It makes a great tool for prototyping
algorithms, performing numerical experiments and solving mathematical
problems. GNU Octave is free software under the terms of the GNU General
Public License.

    Features:
       * Interfaces to Fortran, C/C++, and Java
       * Natively runs most MATLAB programs
       * Core functionality is easily extendable via packages from
various fields
       * Multiple supported platforms

  - Something that is also missing on the “old” site: There are several
subpages but only a small number of fixed top-level links. When I
navigate the site I quickly feel lost. I'd prefer to have some feedback
where I am.
  - Downloads: Deeplinks to (stable release) packages on distro sites
would be a plus. Also, we could clean up the page with a simple table
for faster lookup of the desired information.
  - I forgot where it was (earlier on https://mtmxr.com/octave-beta/ ?),
but I remember a GNU Octave beta website that also highlighted the
availability of (forge) packages. This is very important, since the
packages add a lot to the overall product. Maybe we can also integrate a
package showcase for popular packages.
  - I must say that the CSS layout on the beta page is in an early state
and needs some love before being releasable and before you can say that
it looks more professional than the old one. I immediately notice
several design errors: (1) Vertical text alignment of the links at the
top does not match “GNU Octave” at the top left. (2) Font size, as
mentioned by others, is not properly defined (14px * 1.4em) (3)
Paragraph width is fixed at 1000px(!), without any margin and thus fails
on high or low resulutions or portrait monitor orientation or small
screens (4) the margins used for paragraphs, headers, list etc. seem
random and don't match the rest of the layout – maybe because everything
is defined in the unit px (5) the links at the top should use padding
instead of margin to be easier to click on (6) the content page's layout
is quite boring: no images, and alot of poorly formatted text.

Oliver